Mountain of Faith/Spell Cards/Extra

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< Stage 6   Spell Cards 


Midboss Spell Cards[edit]

Screenshot
Spell Card 98
神符「水眼の如き美しき源泉」 (Shinfu "Suiga no Gotoki Utsukushiki Gensen")
God Sign "Beautiful Spring like Suiga" [1]
Owner
Kanako Yasaka
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 99
神符「杉で結ぶ古き縁」 (Shinfu "Sugi de Musubu Furuki Enishi")
God Sign "Ancient Fate Linked by Cedars" [2]
Owner
Kanako Yasaka
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 100
神符「神が歩かれた御神渡り」 (Shinfu "Kami ga Arukareta Omiwatari")
God Sign "Omiwatari that God Walked" [3]
Owner
Kanako Yasaka
Extra — Extra

Boss Spell Cards[edit]

Screenshot
Spell Card 101
開宴「二拝二拍一拝」 (Kaien "Nihai Nihaku Ippai")
Party Start "Two Bows, Two Claps, and One Bow" [4]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 102
土着神「手長足長さま」 (Dochakushin "Tenaga-ashinaga-sama")
Native God "Lord Long-Arm and Lord Long-Leg" [5]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 103
神具「洩矢の鉄の輪」 (Shingu "Moriya no Tetsu no Wa")
Divine Tool "Moriya's Iron Ring" [6]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 104
源符「厭い川の翡翠」 (Genfu "Itoigawa no Hisui")
Spring Sign "Jade of the Horrid River" [7]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 105
蛙狩「蛙は口ゆえ蛇に呑まるる」 (Kawazugari "Kaeru wa Kuchi yue Hebi ni Nomaruru")
Frog Hunt "The Snake Eats the Croaking Frog" [8]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 106
土着神「七つの石と七つの木」 (Dochakushin "Nanatsu no Ishi to Nanatsu no Ki")
Native God "Seven Stones and Seven Trees" [9]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 107
土着神「ケロちゃん風雨に負けず」 (Dochakushin "Kero-chan Fuu'u ni Makezu")
Native God "Froggy Braves the Wind and Rain" [10]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 108
土着神「宝永四年の赤蛙」 (Dochakushin "Hōei Yonen no Akagaeru")
Native God "Red Frogs of Houei 4" [11]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 109
「諏訪大戦 ~ 土着神話 vs 中央神話」 ("Suwa Taisen ~ Dochaku Shinwa bāsasu Chūō Shinwa")
"Suwa War ~ Native Myth vs Central Myth"[12]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
Screenshot
Spell Card 110
崇符「ミシャグジさま」 (Sūfu "Mishaguji-sama")
Scourge Sign "Mishaguji-sama" [13]
Owner
Suwako Moriya
Extra — Extra
< Stage 6   Spell Cards 

  1. Suiga Clear Stream (水眼の清流 Suiga no Seiryū): A stream running beside the Maemiya (前宮), one of the two shrines that make up the Upper Shrine of Suwa (上社 Kamisha).
  2. Musubi no Sugi (結びの杉 'cedar of fate/marriage'): A giant Japanese cedar tree located in the Spring Court (春宮 Harumiya) of the Lower Shrine of Suwa (下社 Shimosha) in Shimosuwa, Nagano. The name is derived from the tree's forked trunk.
  3. Omiwatari (御神渡り 'the god's crossing'): The name for the pressure ridge that occurs in Lake Suwa during particularly cold winters. Local folklore claims the cracks to be caused by the god Takeminakata crossing the lake to visit his wife Yasakatome who lives on the other shore. (Yasakatome and Takeminakata are the inspiration for Kanako's name and backstory, respectively.) A rather common phenomenon in the past to the point that its absence was believed to spell bad luck for the coming year, the omiwatari has become rarer in recent years, probably due to rising temperatures.
  4. Two Bows, Two Claps and One Bow (二拝・二拍手・一拝): The common manner of worship at a Shinto shrine.
  5. Tenaga and Ashinaga: A pair of giants in Japanese folklore. As their names imply, Tenaga (手長) is long-armed, while Ashinaga (足長) is long-legged. In Suwa, they are believed to be the servants of Suwa Myōjin (i.e. Takeminakata), the god of Suwa Shrine, with some versions even portraying them as a husband and wife pair. Both are associated with Tenaga Shrine (手長神社) and Ashinaga Shrine (足長神社) in Suwa City, where they are identified/conflated with Tenazuchi-no-Mikoto (手摩乳命) and Ashinazuchi-no-Mikoto (足摩乳命), the parents of Susanoo's wife Kushinada-hime.
  6. Moriya's Iron Ring: According to legend, when Takeminakata (Suwa Myōjin) arrived in Suwa, he fought against a local god who tried to hinder him named Moriya (洩矢神 Moriya-no-Kami, also 'Moreya') using only a wisteria branch/vine. In the version recorded in the Suwa Daimyōjin Ekotoba (1356), Moriya's weapon is said to be an "iron ring/wheel" (鉄輪), although in other sources, the weapon is instead referred to as an "iron hook" (鉄鑰, 鉄鎰). (cf. Aya's comments in Double Spoiler)
  7. Horrid River: One theory regarding the origins of the name of Itoigawa City (糸魚川市) in Niigata Prefecture is that it was derived from the term "horrid river" (厭い川 itoi kawa), a nickname applied to the Himekawa River (姫川), which passes through the area, due to its flood-prone nature. Itoigawa is famous for its jade since ancient times and is the only source of jadeite in East Asia, jade from mainland China and Korea being nephrite.
    (Note: The Himekawa's source is located in Hakuba - ZUN's birthplace - in northern Nagano Prefecture. The river itself is named after the goddess Nunakawahime, one of Ōkuninushi's wives and the mother of Takeminakata.)
  8. The Frog Hunting Ritual (蛙狩神事 Kawazugari-shinji) is a ritual performed in the Suwa Upper Shrine every New Year's Day in which two or three hibernating frogs are obtained from the frozen Mitarashi-kawa (御手洗川), a small stream running on the eastern side of the Upper Shrine's main shrine (本宮 Honmiya). The frogs are then ritually 'shot' (skewered) with miniature bow and arrows and offered to the shrine's deity as a sacrifice. The origins and the original purpose of the ritual is lost to history, although a medieval legend claims the hunt to be a reenactment of Suwa Myōjin's defeat of a wild frog deity (蝦蟆神). The ritual has come under criticism in recent years from certain animal rights activists due to the perceived cruelty to the frogs involved.
    The frog gets eaten (by the snake) due to its croaking (蛙は口ゆえ蛇に呑まるる Kaeru/kawazu wa kuchi yue hebi ni nomaruru, 蛙は口から呑まるる Kaeru/kawazu wa kuchi kara nomaruru): A Japanese proverb meaning "to behave in a way likely to result in disaster" (cf. the expression "to ride for a fall").
  9. The Seven Stones (七石 shichiseki) are sacred stones in the cities of Chino and Suwa associated with the Suwa Upper Shrine. The Seven Trees (七木 shichiboku / hichiboku) are sacred trees counted among the tatae (湛, also tatai), places in Suwa marked by natural objects where the Mishaguji are worshiped. During the Middle Ages, six boys acting as representatives of the Upper Shrine's high priest (大祝 Ōhōri) known as the Okō (神使 'messengers of the deity', also Kōdono or Okō-sama) visit the various tatae in pairs at the beginning of spring and perform rituals therein to pray for bountiful crops.
  10. A reference to the first two lines of Kenji Miyazawa's poem "Be not Defeated by the Rain" (雨ニモマケズ Ame ni mo Makezu). Might also double as a dig at Kanako, who is a goddess of wind and rain.
    The nickname 'Kero-chan' (ケロちゃん) could be inspired by the frog mascot of Kowa Company Ltd. (興和株式会社) of the same name.
  11. The Frog Hunting Ritual is counted among the Seven Wonders of Suwa Shrine, as it is claimed that every year at least two or three frogs are certain to be found in the frozen waters of the Mitarashi-kawa (although there are scattered records noting that no frogs were caught in certain years). In 1707 (the fourth year of the Hōei Era) the ritual was almost cancelled due to flooding caused by heavy rain which melted the stream's waters, but three frogs were nonetheless discovered and the ceremony proceeded as planned.
    Akagaeru (赤蛙 / アカガエル, lit. 'red frog') is the Japanese name for brown frogs (genus Rana). Species of brown frog endemic to Japan include the Japanese brown frog (Rana japonica, Japanese name: ニホンアカガエル Nihon akagaeru) and the montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris, Japanese name: ヤマアカガエル Yama akagaeru).
  12. The danmaku pattern is a reference to Takeminakata's wisteria vine and Moriya's iron ring.
  13. The danmaku pattern resembles the front cover of the 2003 book Kenpō Moriya Monjo o Yomu (県宝守矢文書を読む "Reading the Moriya Clan Documents") by Kisuke Hosoda (細田貴助).
    The Mishaguji are deities / spirits worshiped in various areas throughout central and eastern Japan. They are associated in folk beliefs among other things with fertility and agriculture and were even considered to be patrons of local communities in the same vein as saikami (gods of boundaries or borders). In the Upper Shrine of Suwa, the Mishaguji formerly played an important role in many of the shrine's winter and spring religious ceremonies. Summoning the Mishaguji's presence in religious rituals was the sole privilege of one of the shrine's priests, the Jinchōkan (神長官) of the Moriya clan (守矢氏), considered to be descendants of the god Moriya.
    In popular culture, the Mishaguji are often characterized as 'curse gods' (祟り神 tatari-gami). This is derived from the belief that the people who were to act as vessels for the Mishaguji in the Upper Shrine's rituals (such as the six Okō messengers) must be ritually pure under pain of severe divine punishment, which was believed to fall not just upon the offending individual but also upon their families and even their animals.